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Combos for Landscapes


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#1 NikoPalad67140

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 07:19 AM

Hey guys!

For my first quest, "Element Travel", I want to use the different Color Sets for different landscapes. Which Color Set should I use for which landscape?



#2 Lüt

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 08:30 AM

That depends on the tileset.

 

Generally, CSets 2 3 and 4 are considered "level color sets," meaning that those CSets change to match whatever level palette your screens are using, so those are the ones you should generally design your screens with. That's a core foundation of the ZC program itself, so those CSets are the ones that most tilesets will be configured to use for screen design.

 

CSet 2 is considered the default in most cases, but some tilesets like DoR will have a majority of their landscape tiles default to CSet 3.

 

If you're looking for a lot of color variety across a number of different areas, you're best off changing up your level palettes rather than using non-level CSets in your screens.


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#3 NikoPalad67140

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 12:27 AM

I thought about this to begin : CSet 2 for plains (Hyrule Fields) and CSet 0 for a snowy mountain (Namut Peak). Any thoughts about it? Also, I will use the same CSets for the dungeons : for example, if I use the CSet for Hyrule Fields, I will use the same CSet for its dungeon.


Edited by NikoPalad67140, 13 October 2020 - 01:05 AM.


#4 Twilight Knight

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 02:33 AM

Of course it's all right to use any approach you'd like. However, the level palettes that Lüt mentioned are very useful for what you want to achieve.

 

Basically you can have 4 unique Csets (cset 2, 3, 4 and 9) per area (area = dmap) with such a level palette. That might serve you well if you want to have more snowy colours in that Namut Peak area you mentioned. Or maybe you want a graveyard where all the colours are a bit darker.

 

I think the best way to learn and see the advantages is by checking examples. Luckily we have a database with many tilesets ready for use: https://www.purezc.n...ets&sort=rating

 

I'd recommend checking any of the popular tilesets. They usually have example screens demonstrating the various graphics and palettes.



#5 NikoPalad67140

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 05:33 AM

Of course it's all right to use any approach you'd like. However, the level palettes that Lüt mentioned are very useful for what you want to achieve.

 

Basically you can have 4 unique Csets (cset 2, 3, 4 and 9) per area (area = dmap) with such a level palette. That might serve you well if you want to have more snowy colours in that Namut Peak area you mentioned. Or maybe you want a graveyard where all the colours are a bit darker.

That sounds useful. Do you mean that I can have one DMap per CSet?



#6 Lüt

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Posted 13 October 2020 - 07:22 AM

I thought about this to begin : CSet 2 for plains (Hyrule Fields) and CSet 0 for a snowy mountain (Namut Peak). Any thoughts about it?

Snowy areas are a common usage for CSet 0 in classic, and one of the only good uses of its inverse-colored overworld tiles. I've used it myself, as have a lot of other classic-styled quests, so yes it's a good thought.

Another thing to mention, though, is that if you're using fade-based screen transitions (such as item cellars and passageways in dungeons or side warps on overworlds), only CSets 2 3 and 4 will fade during those transitions. This is why we only refer to 2 3 and 4 as "level CSets" even though you can also change CSet 9 per level palette, because CSet 9 is meant for level-based sprites (like level-colored enemies) so it won't fade during those transitions.

That sounds useful. Do you mean that I can have one DMap per CSet?

It's more like the other way around.

A DMap is a collection of settings for a certain area in your quest. One of those settings is the level palette. When you change the level palette, you're changing CSets 2 3 4 and 9. You can preview the different level palettes by pressing F4 on a screen and choosing from the list, but this only affects your ZQuest screen display - the in-game screen colors are determined by your DMap settings.

So you can have 3 level CSets and 1 sprite CSet per DMap.

(Though again, you can use non-level CSets in your screens, but those will remain the same color regardless of the level palette you choose, and they won't fade during fade transitions.)


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