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is php dead


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#1 MrCrazy66

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Posted 11 March 2020 - 09:46 AM

Would you guys say that php is a dead language for web design?



#2 ZoriaRPG

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Posted 14 March 2020 - 05:43 AM

Would you guys say that php is a dead language for web design?

 

Not in the least, nor is Perl. That's basically like asking is SQL is dead. The canon of web languages remains HTML, SQL, PHP, CSS, Perl, JS. I'd stress, in that order of necessity.

 

Naturally, what you use will depend on the nature of what you want to accomplish. Flash is effectively dead, because browsers no longer support it, and in fact, they actively reject it. I don't particularly support (or agree with) the model of a web client refusing to allow the user to access any data format, if they accept the risks involved, but I also comprehend the current trend of releasing software aimed at the lowest common denominator.


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#3 Rambly

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Posted 14 March 2020 - 06:15 AM

I'd go a step further and add that the very forum we're posting on uses PHP.  :P  Also, Facebook uses some weird proprietary PHP compiler to run everything much more quickly than an interpreted language could -- but underneath everything, at heart, it's still largely based around PHP code.  Hack -- Facebook's programming language -- ultimately derives from PHP.  I'd argue that if one of the most popular websites in the world uses PHP, it's probably doing all right.
 
PHP isn't as popular as it used to be and it's certainly fallen out of vogue with web programmers -- it gets maligned a lot, some of which I think is fair and some of which I think is a little overblown.  But it's certainly not dead by any stretch of the imagination and I know a lot of developers personally who still work with PHP in their day-to-day lives.

 

The canon of web languages remains HTML, SQL, PHP, CSS, Perl, JS. I'd stress, in that order of necessity.

I'd add Python and Ruby to the canon -- they've been pretty popular for most of the past 15 years.  I'd even add C++, Java and other compiled languages to the list for websites that need to be scalable.  I'd put JavaScript a bit higher in the order of necessity, too.


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#4 Twilight Knight

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Posted 14 March 2020 - 12:35 PM

I wouldn't know the statistics, but I do think it's less popular nowadays. Don't think it's less used though, but the spotlight has kinda been taken by other programming languages. Such as Python and Ruby like Rambly pointed out, but what's also really trending is building fully asynchronous web applications (one-pagers without refreshing) or progressive web applications (which can be used offline and are super light weight, web-based replacements for native apps for Android, iOS etc.).

 

Much like YouTube. Did you notice it has no page refreshments at all? I believe it's built in React or Vue, JavaScript frameworks highly suitable for these asynchronous web apps. These trends have really been taking the lead in popularity amongst high end web development today.

 

But I use PHP all the time. Need an API for your React/Vue app? Generate a PDF? Transform images programmatically? Need a simple and easy to use backend framework for a synchronous web app? Need a diverse and solid content management system? PHP is truly viable in these use cases due to the wide amount of available frameworks and packages and it's a very easy to learn language that can help you accomplish awesome stuff!

 

If you're looking for a more state-of-the-art, hip and trending backend language I would recommend Node.JS and ExpressJS for certain. Great perfomance and similar to JavaScript, keeping the learning curve very low when also using Vue or React as your frontend framework. In this case Parcel is great for when not knowing how to do the dev-ops stuff like Vagrant or Docker.


Edited by Twilight Knight, 14 March 2020 - 12:38 PM.

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#5 MrCrazy66

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Posted 14 March 2020 - 01:05 PM

Thanks for the answers guys. Php is not dead good that is an easy languages if it was dead i would have to move up to a different

language.


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#6 ZoriaRPG

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 07:19 PM

I'd go a step further and add that the very forum we're posting on uses PHP.  :P  Also, Facebook uses some weird proprietary PHP compiler to run everything much more quickly than an interpreted language could -- but underneath everything, at heart, it's still largely based around PHP code.  Hack -- Facebook's programming language -- ultimately derives from PHP.  I'd argue that if one of the most popular websites in the world uses PHP, it's probably doing all right.
 
PHP isn't as popular as it used to be and it's certainly fallen out of vogue with web programmers -- it gets maligned a lot, some of which I think is fair and some of which I think is a little overblown.  But it's certainly not dead by any stretch of the imagination and I know a lot of developers personally who still work with PHP in their day-to-day lives.

 

I'd add Python and Ruby to the canon -- they've been pretty popular for most of the past 15 years.  I'd even add C++, Java and other compiled languages to the list for websites that need to be scalable.  I'd put JavaScript a bit higher in the order of necessity, too.

 

I've never had a valid reason to use Python.

 

Ruby, aye, although i don't consider it a server language. What is the application for it in that department now?

 

The priority for JS depends greatly on what you are doing. I pretty much never use it.




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